The blog.

24
Apr

Adoptable (Official) Georgia Dogs for April 24, 2017

Rafiki

Rafiki is an 8-week old male Terrier mix puppy who is available for adoption from Coastal Pet Rescue in Savannah, GA.

Sarafina

Sarafina is an 8-week old Australian Cattle Dog (Blue Heeler) & Jack Russell Terrier mix puppy who is available for adoption from Coastal Pet Rescue in Savannah, GA.

Kiara

Kiara is an 8-week old female Terrier mix puppy who is available for adoption from Coastal Pet Rescue in Savannah, GA.

24
Apr

Georgia Politics, Campaigns, and Elections for April 24, 2017

The Library of Congress was founded on April 24, 1800 and is the largest library in the world today.

On April 24, 1945, President Harry Truman was briefed on the Manhattan Project to create the first atomic bomb.

Jack Kingston was born on April 24, 1955. He was elected to the Georgia House of Representatives in 1984 and served four terms and in 1992 was elected to the United States Congress.

“Georgia On My Mind” became the official state song on April 24, 1979, when Governor George Busbee signed legislation designating it.

IBM introduced the Personal Computer Model 5150 on April 24, 1981, though some authorities date the introduction to April 12. It sported an Intel 8088 processor at 4.77 Mhz, a whopping 16k of RAM, which was expandable to 256k, and a clicky keyboard. The initial price tag was $1565, equivalent to more than $4000 today.

Creepy wax figures from a Warm Springs museum will be sold at auction.

About 60 life-size wax figures, including a one-of-a-kind figure of Albert Einstein that was signed and inscribed by Einstein himself, will headline an auction of items owned by Preston Evans, the Cowetan who operated the museum for more than four years. The auction is set for May 13 at the Eisenhower Hotel and Conference Center in Gettysburg, Pa.

These include figures of 10 U.S. presidents and four first ladies, civil rights leaders –including Martin Luther King Jr. and Ralph Bunche, entertainers Rudolf Valentino and Dolly Parton, military figures such as Patton and MacArthur, cowboys and Indians including Geronimo.

Georgia Politics, Campaigns, and Elections

Former Governor Sonny Perdue is expected to win confirmation as Secretary of Agriculture in a vote of the full United States Senate today.

Perdue would be the first Southerner in the post in more than two decades. He’s the son of a farmer and has owned several agricultural companies. The Senate plans to vote on his nomination Monday.

At his confirmation hearing in March, Perdue assured nervous farm-state senators that he will advocate for rural America, even as President Donald Trump’s administration has proposed deep cuts to some farm programs. He promised to reach out to Democrats, and several Democratic senators have said they will vote for him.

Perdue may also find himself in the uncomfortable position of defending agriculture in an administration that has given the issue very little attention, despite Trump’s strong support in rural areas. Trump has proposed a 21 percent cut in USDA programs and has harshly criticized some international trade deals, saying they have killed American jobs. But farmers who produce more than they can sell in the United States have heavily profited from some of those deals, and are hoping his anti-trade policies will include some exceptions for agriculture.

Tamar Hallerman of the AJC writes about what Secretary of Agriculture Sonny Perdue could mean for Georgia.

 “He knows the struggles that farmers deal with on a day-to-day basis,” [Bonaire farmer Matt] Coley said of Perdue. “Having that perspective in D.C. would certainly be a benefit when decisions are having to be made.”

“When he was governor, he spent a large amount of his time traveling the world selling Georgia and selling Georgia ag products,” said Georgia Chamber of Commerce President Chris Clark, who served as natural resources commissioner in the Perdue administration.

Perdue’s expected confirmation, he said, gives “us, our farmers, our forestry an opportunity to grow our brand.”

Perdue would be the first ever agriculture head to hail from Georgia, and the first southerner in more than two decades.

“The voices of Southeastern agriculture are going to be heard and that’s exciting,” said Georgia Agriculture Commissioner Gary Black.

Democrats claim that Georgia’s requirement that special runoff election voters were registered in time to vote in the initial special election suppresses voters in violation of federal law.

The Georgia NAACP, Lawyers Committee for Civil rights, Asian Americans Advancing Justice and other organizations said Secretary of State Brian Kemp is violating the National Voter Registration ACT by prohibiting voters from registering for the upcoming June runoff election. The lawsuit indicates federal elections, including runoff elections, allow for voter registration up until 30 days before the election.

“Georgia has a sordid history of discouraging voter participation. We ask they follow the federal guidelines, 30 days prior to the election should be when the registration period should ends,” Atlanta NAACP President Richard Rose said.

But Kemp said the June runoff is a continuation of Tuesday’s election and Georgia law said if you were not registered for the initial election, then you cannot register now.

“For us to have to stop and have our local election officials and registrars stop what they are doing in this process and implement something like this, it would be a nightmare that would really effect the integrity of the election,” Kemp said.

Columbus Mayor Teresa Tomlinson weighed in on the Sixth Congressional District Special Runoff Election.

Tomlinson likes Ossoff’s chances, stating that Ossoff carried 200 precincts and Handel just eight. Tomlinson said “that is a pretty heavy lift for her.”

The mayor said while Republicans did get 52 percent of the vote in the special election, she wanted to point out 81 percent of those coming to the polls voted against Handel.

Tomlinson said while it is historically true that the district is predominately Republican, there are a lot of “business Republicans” who are moderate.

“It is not a heavy ideological district,” said Tomlinson, 52, who was raised in the district and has family there.

She said there is obviously a lot of interest in the race, with about 193,000 voters coming to the polls.

“For a special election, that is extraordinary,” she said.

Washington-based Foundation for Accountability and Civic Trust (FACT) said it will file an ethics complaint against Congressman Hank Johnson (D-Lithonia), alleging improper use of his official website to boost the election of Jon Ossoff.

Georgia Public Service Commissioner Tim Echols will serve as vice chairman of the National Association of Regulatory Utility Commissioners’  Nuclear Issues-Waste Disposal Subcommittee.

“The wise disposition of nuclear waste continues to be one of the most important issues of our day,” Echols said. “If we don’t come up with a solution soon, we’ll need nine Yucca Mountain repositories by the end of the century, and that would be impossible to bring about.”

Houston County Commissioners face a tough budget process this year.

Tax revenues are expected to have slow growth this year in Houston County, which means another tough budget year.

The county is just now starting the process for formulating its budget for the upcoming fiscal year to begin July 1. Commission Chairman Tommy Stalnaker, who always issues words of caution as the budget year starts, gave an especially stark assessment last week.

“I am more concerned this year than I’ve ever been before in putting this budget together,” he said at the end of Tuesday’s commission meeting. “I’ve never felt the way I do this year going to this budget cycle. It is going to be gruesome.”

Rep. Ed Rynders (R-Leesburg ) is enthusiastic about the House Rural Development Council.

“HR 389 is chiefly Speaker David Ralston’s initiative,” Rynders said. “I don’t know if any speaker has visited more communities than Speaker Ralston. In his travels he has listened to the people throughout rural Georgia who are seeking meaningful economic development.

“I appreciate the speaker’s commitment to rural Georgia and look forward to trying to improve the quality of life for all Georgians. But keep in mind that one size doesn’t fit all even in rural Georgia. This council will look for solutions for job creation while addressing the unique challenges facing our communities.”

2018 Elections

State Senator Burt Jones (R-Jackson) is considering a run for statewide office in 2018.

Even though two well-known politicians already have announced their intentions to seek the seat of governor in 2018, Jones’ name continues to surface in political circles as a possible third GOP candidate. Lt. Gov. Casey Cagle and Secretary of State Brian Kemp are already campaigning for the seat currently held by Gov. Nathan Deal, now in his second term as the state’s top political leader.

“Probably the biggest problem I have is that I actually enjoy what I’m doing right now,” Jones said with a laugh, as he talked about his political aspirations with The Union-Recorder. “I really do enjoy what I’m doing, because of the fact that I can still run my business and I’ve got a very flexible schedule with family and everything. And that’s important to me.”

“Right now, I’m weighing all of my options, and looking to see if there is an opportunity lying out there in the pits,” said Jones, an insurance executive in his family’s business in Jackson, who is in his fifth year as a state senator. “You can make up all kinds of reasons not to do something, but the biggest issue for me would be that I get a good comfort level, and that this is something my family allows me to take on, and then I’ll make a decision.”

Jones said he plans to make a decision about his political future within the next couple of months.

“I’m looking at all the parameters of what it would cost, and what kind of team I could put together, etc.,” Jones said of possibly becoming the third Republican incumbent state office holder to run for governor.

“If, and that’s the big word, if, I would announce my intentions at some sort of an event,” said Jones, noting that it could happen at a political fundraising rally at an area venue.

Liberal Daily Kos says this about the timing of the Governor’s race.

If Jones does get in, he does have one potentially strong selling point to voters. Jones was the co-captain of the University of Georgia’s football team when they won the 2003 Sugar Bowl, which came just after the Bulldogs won their first SEC championship in 20 years. However, Secretary of State Brian Kemp is already running while Lt. Gov. Casey Cagle is raising money for his likely bid, and a number of other Peach State Republicans are considering. By the time Jones makes up his mind, other campaigns may have a huge organizational head start.

Alpharetta Mayor David Belle Isle will announce today that he is running for Secretary of State in 2018.

Alpharetta Mayor David Belle Isle said Friday he plans to enter the race for Georgia Secretary of State in 2018.

Belle Isle, 42, became mayor in 2012 and is in the last half of his second and final term.

A formal announcement will take place Monday.

“I love the city of Alpharetta and want to keep serving it,” Belle Isle said Friday. “I think this is an opportunity to do for Georgia what we’ve done for Alpharetta.”

“I want to make Georgia the best at what it does,” he said. “Technology is one of those things, but also the moving of people and goods from our ports … and the marketing of crops and livestock.”

Belle Isle will join previously announced candidates for Secretary of State Buzz Brockway, Geoff Duncan, and Brad Raffensperger, all current State House members.

21
Apr

Adoptable (Official) Georgia Dogs for April 21, 2017

GracieCobb

Gracie is a year-old, 45-pound female German Shepherd who is available for adoption from the Cobb County Animal Shelter in Marietta, GA.

She is pretty terrified at the shelter, so much so that she won’t even walk down the aisles. However, once outside and away from the noise of the shelter she does great! He is current on her vaccines and upon adoption will be spayed, heartworm tested and micro chipped. Gracie’s ID # is 595272 and can be found in cage 88.

Emerson Cobb

Emerson is a 10-month old, 57-pound male Hound mix who is available for adoption from the Cobb County Animal Shelter in Marietta, GA.

Emerson is adorable and so very sweet. Just look at his darling face and you will melt. He is a little shy, but he is young and eager to please. He already knows his commands to sit, stay and lay down and will learn quickly pretty much anything you want to teach him. His ID at the shelter is 595270 and he is in run 80. His run number could change, so please make a note of his ID number and ask for assistance if you don’t find him in run 80.

Taylor Cobb

Taylor is a four-year old female Dachshund mix who is available for adoption from the Cobb County Animal Shelter in Marietta, GA.

Taylor is small, very sweet, and calm and quiet. She also sits when told. Her ID at the shelter is 595260 and she is in cage 513.

21
Apr

Georgia Politics, Campaigns, and Elections for April 21, 2017

According to tradition, on April 21, 753 B.C., Rome was founded. The one in Italy, not the one in Floyd County.

William Shakespeare was born April 23, 1564 and died April 23, 1616.

On April 21, 1732, King George II signed the royal charter creating the colony of Georgia. The King’s signature did not make the charter effective as several additional steps were required.

On April 21, 1789, John Adams was sworn in as the first Vice President of the United States.

On April 22, 1891, Asa Candler bought the recipe for Coca-Cola for $2300 and eventually turned its marketing from a “brain tonic” into a plain old tasty beverage.

Lucius D. Clay was born in Marietta, Georgia on April 23, 1898, the son of Georgia U.S. Senator Alexander Stephens Clay, who served in the Senate from 1896 until his death in 1910. Clay graduated West Point in 1915 and eventually rose to serve as Supreme Allied Commander Dwight D. Eisenhower’s Deputy for Military Government. During the Berlin Airlift, Clay helped keep Allied-occupied West Berlin supplied with food for almost a year after Soviet forces blockaded all land routes into the city.

On April 21, 1904, Ty Cobb made his debut in professional baseball for the Augusta (Georgia) Tourists in the South Atlantic League in center field; Cobb hit an inside-the-field home run and a double.

Manfred von Richthofen, known as “The Red Baron,” was killed in action on April 21, 1918, shot by either an Australian gunner or a Canadian. At the time of his death, Richthofen has shot down 80 aircraft in aerial combat.

Adolf Hitler admitted defeat in World War II on April 22, 1945.

Hank Aaron his his first home run in major league baseball on April 23, 1954, playing for the Milwaukee Braves against the St. Louis Cardinals.

The Atlanta Braves won their first home game in Atlanta Stadium on April 22, 1966. The Braves beat the New York Mets 8-4. It’s interesting to look back at how the Braves landed in Atlanta.

During his 1961 campaign for mayor of Atlanta, Ivan Allen, Jr. promised to build a sports facility to attract a Major League Baseball team. After winning office, Allen chose a 47-acre plot in the Washington–Rawson neighborhood for the building site, citing its proximity to the Georgia State Capitol, downtown businesses and major highways. Allen, along with Atlanta Journal sports editor Furman Bisher, attempted to persuade Charlie Finley, owner of the Kansas City Athletics, to move his team to Atlanta. Finley was receptive and began discussing stadium design plans with Allen. The deal, however, ended in July 1963 when the American League did not approve the move.

In 1964, Mayor Allen announced that an unidentified team had given him a verbal commitment to move to Atlanta, provided a stadium was in place by 1966. Soon afterward, the prospective team was revealed to be the Milwaukee Braves, who announced in October that they intended to move to Atlanta for the 1965 season. However, court battles kept the Braves in Milwaukee for one last season.

The Blues Brothers made their worldwide debut on Saturday Night Live on April 22, 1978. Two prominent Georgia musicians, Ray Charles (born Albany) and James Brown (died Atlanta) would co-star in The Blues Brothers movie.

New Coke was announced on April 23, 1985.

Former President Richard Nixon died on April 22, 1994.

Former President Jimmy Carter was appointed Distinguished Professor at Emory University on April 21, 1982. Carter holds an annual Town Hall in which he takes questions from students.

On April 21, 1988, President Ronald Reagan signed a Memorandum of Agreement with Israel. From the press statement released that day,

The MOA reiterates for the public record our long-standing relationship of strategic cooperation with Israel. Strategic cooperation can only succeed when there are shared interests, including the commitment to building peace and stability in the region. It reflects the enduring U.S. commitment to Israel’s security. That commitment will never flag. The U.S. commitment to peace will also not flag. The President knows that a strong Israel is necessary if peace is to be possible. He also knows that Israel can never be truly secure without peace.

Georgia Politics, Campaigns, and Elections

Governor Nathan Deal yesterday signed HB 573 – Cook County; Probate Court; judge shall have jurisdiction to try misdemeanor cases where defendant waives jury trial and pleads guilty; provide.

Jeremy Berry will trade in private practice at Dentons to become Atlanta’s City Attorney.

“I am excited to name Jeremy Berry as the new City Attorney,” said Mayor Reed. “Over the last decade, I’ve gotten to know Jeremy as a talented attorney and as an active, dedicated member of his community. I believe he will bring his unique insight and valuable experience to this role, and will serve the people of Atlanta, the Atlanta City Council and my Administration in an exemplary fashion.”

“I am honored that Mayor Reed has offered me the opportunity to serve as City Attorney,” Berry said. “For the past fourteen years, I have focused my career on working with governments and elected officials, and working at the intersection of law, politics, and business. I am thankful to have the opportunity to serve the public, the Atlanta City Council, and of course Mayor Reed. I know I have very big shoes to fill, and look forward to working with each member of the City’s Law Department.”

Berry graduated from Emory University School of Law in 2003. Prior to graduating law school, Berry served as the assistant director of federal affairs for Emory University. In 2014, Emory College honored Berry for his distinguished community and public service with its Young Alumni Service Award.

Berry is alumnus of Leadership DeKalb. He is active in the community, serving on the Board of Directors and Civil Rights Committee of the Anti-Defamation League. Berry is also active with the Jewish Federation of Greater Atlanta, Jewish Family and Career Services of Greater Atlanta, and Red Clay Democrats.

Speaker David Ralston has appointed members of the House Rural Development Council, created during this year’s legislative session by House Resolution 389 to work with rural communities to find ways to encourage economic growth.

“Georgia is a growing and prosperous state, and we are thankful for that,” said Speaker Ralston.  “But that prosperity isn’t being felt in every community across Georgia. Some of our rural areas are still struggling, and we must do everything we can to help private businesses grow jobs in every corner of our state.”

Speaker Ralston has previously announced that the council will be co-chaired by Appropriations Chairman Terry England (R-Auburn) and Ways & Means Chairman Jay Powell (R-Camilla). Rep. Sam Watson (R-Moultrie), who chairs the House Rural Caucus, will serve as vice chair of the council.

The other members of the House Rural Development Council are:

  • Patty Bentley (D-Butler)
  • John Corbett (R-Lake Park)
  • Matt Hatchett (R-Dublin)
  • Mack Jackson (D-Sandersville)
  • Dominic LaRiccia (R-Douglas)
  • Eddie Lumsden (R-Armuchee)
  • Chad Nimmer (R-Blackshear)
  • Clay Pirkle (R-Ashburn)
  • Terry Rogers (R-Clarkesville)
  • Ed Rynders (R-Albany)
  • Darlene Taylor (R-Thomasville)
  • Bill Werkheiser (R-Glennville)

In addition, Speaker Ralston has named the following committee chairmen to serve as ex-officio members of the House Rural Development Council based on their subject-area expertise:

  • Brooks Coleman – Chairman of Education
  • Sharon Cooper – Chairman of Health & Human Services
  • Robert Dickey – Chairman of K-12 Education (Appropriations)
  • Penny Houston – Chairman of Economic Development (Appropriations)
  • Rick Jasperse – Chairman of Higher Education
  • Tom McCall – Chairman of Agriculture & Consumer Affairs
  • Butch Parrish – Chairman of Healthcare (Appropriations)
  • Don Parsons – Chairman of Energy, Utilities & Telecommunications
  • Jason Shaw – Chairman of Transportation & Infrastructure (Appropriations)
  • Ron Stephens – Chairman of Economic Development
  • Kevin Tanner – Chairman of Transportation

The House Rural Development Council will host its first meeting next month. More details on that meeting will be announced soon.

Green Power EMC brought a 52 megawatt solar installation near Hazlehurst, Georgia online.

The new 52-megawatt solar facility in Hazlehurst is expected to generate more than 134 million kilowatt hours of renewable energy annually for customers of Green Power EMC for the next 30 years, according to a news release.

Green Power EMC was the first green energy provider in the state. It was created by Georgia’s EMCs in 2001 and has been selling green energy since 2003. Green Power EMC obtains green power from renewable energy facilities throughout Georgia, including solar power, low-impact hydroelectric, landfill gas and biomass from wood waste.

Cobb County Commissioners will consider applying for $6.8 million in federal funding for transit on Sundays.

Hospital Corporation of America will buy Memorial University Medical Center in Savannah for a package valued at $710 million dollars.

“This will essentially be a sale of the hospital,” said J. Curtis Lewis III, board chairman of Memorial Health. “I think it’s a very positive thing for the community.”

HCA will now have a 60-day period to conduct due diligence, Lewis said, adding, “Our next step is to keep the place going.”

The deal is valued at $710 million. Included in the $710 million purchase fee is $430 million, which will pay off bonds and other debts as well as $280 million over the next 10 years to fund capital improvements — $100 million for non-routine capital expenditures and $180 million for routine capital expenditures.

All other proceeds of the sale will go to the Chatham County Hospital Authority for creation of an indigent care trust fund.

He said the authority insisted and got guarantees that, as part of the deal, HCA will maintain core services including Level 1 trauma care, the Level 3 neo-natal ICU and Mercer University School of Medicine Savannah Campus at Memorial.

Coweta County held a Town Hall meeting to discuss Special Purpose Local Option Sales Tax (SPLOST) priorities, but few showed up.

Just four members of the public attended the meeting, which was for the 2nd District, represented by Commissioner Tim Lassetter. It’s the largest of Coweta’s five districts, covering nearly half of the county – almost everything west of Carrollton Highway on the north side, and everything west of U.S. Highway 29 on the south side, as well as Moreland and nearly to Sharpsburg.

The primary focus of the meetings is to discuss SPLOST and to ask Cowetans what important projects they would like to see funded with the 1 percent sales tax. Cowetans will go to the polls in November to decide whether to extend the tax, which expires at the end of 2018, until 2025. The SPLOST vote will coincide with municipal elections.

Senoia City Council members heard from the City Manager about priorities for the city’s SPLOST portion.

A vote on the six-year extension of the 1 percent sales tax is set for November, though the current tax doesn’t expire until the end of 2018. Before the vote, Coweta County and all its municipalities must put together a list of projects to be funded with the tax. That process is getting started.

Senoia City Manager Harold Simmons told the Senoia City Council about his priorities at Monday’s council meeting.

Sixth District Congressional Runoff Election

United States Senator David Perdue has endorsed Karen Handel in the Runoff Election for the Sixth Congressional District.

“Republicans are at our best when we are united. In Georgia’s 6th District, our work is not over. We now have nine weeks for an all-hands on deck effort to reveal the true choice in this race. National liberal groups are spending millions to mislead the people of the 6th District. We all know Jon Ossoff will not be a moderate if he gets to Congress. It’s time for Republicans to come together. I not only endorse Karen Handel, but pledge my full support in the coming weeks to make sure Nancy Pelosi doesn’t get one more vote in the United States House of Representatives.” – Senator David Perdue

House Speaker Paul Ryan is making plans to campaign for Handel.

Patricia Ryan writes in The Hill about how Democrat Jon Ossoff became the focus of nationwide liberal angst over President Trump.

In the days after Donald Trump was inaugurated in January, liberals in America were depressed, despondent, and asking themselves what to do next. David Nir, the political director of the liberal blog Daily Kos, had an answer and that answer was Jon Ossoff.

Nir and the Daily Kos team had been crunching the numbers from Trump’s election since the day after it happened. Which districts did Trump underperform in? Where were the opportunities for Democrats? They quickly noticed that in Georgia’s 6th Congressional District, which Mitt Romney won by 23 points in 2012, Trump had won by just a point and a half. Could Rep. Tom Price be vulnerable the next time around?

But within weeks, the Price seat was not just a target for 2018, it became the prize in a 2017 special election, after Trump tapped Price as his secretary of Health and Human Services to oversee the dismantling of Obamacare. In the minds of progressives, the Price seat was not just open, it was ground zero for the Trump resistance.

“No one wants to wait until 2018 — or 2020 — to fight back against Donald Trump,” Nir wrote in a post on Daily Kos at the end of January. “The good news is, we don’t have to.”

Nir then went on to introduce the site’s 3 million readers to Ossoff, a then-29-year-old former congressional staffer who had jumped into the special election in early January.

The most interesting issue to me in the 6th District race is how Ossoff consolidated all the national organizations behind him despite a number of other credible-looking candidates. Patricia Murphy’s story is the best I’ve seen on that and is worth reading in its entirety.

20
Apr

Adoptable (Official) Georgia Dogs for April 20, 2017

American Bulldogs are described as a gentle, affectionate dog that loves children and can be considered a big lap dog.

In addition to the three American Bulldog puppies profiled below, Dolly GoodPuppy Society has three additional litter mates, as well as smaller-breed puppies and adults dogs available for adoption.

Honor

Honor is a female American Bulldog mix puppy who is available for adoption from Dolly Goodpuppy Society Inc in Barnesville, GA.

Honor is a strikingly beautiful American Bulldog pup, she is solid white except for the ring around her left eye.She has a very sweet, laid back personality. Honor enjoys treats, toys, and playing with her friends.

Yeah Yeah

Yeah Yeah is a male American Bulldog mix puppy who is available for adoption from Dolly Goodpuppy Society Inc in Barnesville, GA.

Smalls

Smalls is a male American Bulldog mix puppy who is available for adoption from Dolly Goodpuppy Society Inc in Barnesville, GA. Even as a puppy Smalls is kind, affectionate, and docile.

20
Apr

Georgia Politics, Campaigns, and Elections for April 20, 2017

Yesterday, I mistakenly included the history items from today, so now I’m making up yesterday’s history lesson.

On April 19, 1775, British troops entered Lexington, Massachusetts, encountering 77 armed Minute Men.

British Major John Pitcairn ordered the outnumbered Patriots to disperse, and after a moment’s hesitation the Americans began to drift off the green. Suddenly, the “shot heard around the world” was fired from an undetermined gun, and a cloud of musket smoke soon covered the green. When the brief Battle of Lexington ended, eight Americans lay dead or dying and 10 others were wounded. Only one British soldier was injured, but the American Revolution had begun.

Two hours later, another confrontation between the British and American patriots took place in Concord, Massachusetts.

On April 19, 1861, President Abraham Lincoln ordered the blockade of ports in “Rebellious States.”

Whereas an insurrection against the Government of the United States has broken out in the States of South Carolina, Georgia, Alabama, Florida, Mississippi, Louisiana, and Texas, and the laws of the United States for the collection of the revenue can not be effectually executed therein conformably to that provision of the Constitution which requires duties to be uniform throughout the United States; and

….

Now, therefore, I, Abraham Lincoln, President of the United States, with a view to the same purposes before mentioned and to the protection of the public peace and the lives and property of quiet and orderly citizens pursuing their lawful occupations until Congress shall have assembled and deliberated on the said unlawful proceedings or until the same shall have ceased, have further deemed it advisable to set on foot a blockade of the ports within the States aforesaid, in pursuance of the laws of the United States and of the law of nations in such case provided. For this purpose a competent force will be posted so as to prevent entrance and exit of vessels from the ports aforesaid.

Union forces skirmished against The Worrill Grays, a Georgia Reserve Militia, at the Battle of Culloden, 30 miles west of Macon on a date generally believed to have been April 19, 1865, though it may have occurred later.

On April 19, 1995, Governor Zell Miller signed legislation declaring the peanut the Official State Crop.

Georgia Politics, Campaigns, and Elections

Governor Deal signed three bills on Tuesday:

HB 264 Georgia World Congress Center Authority; revenue bond capacity; increase April 18, 2017

SB 121 “Jeffrey Dallas Gay, Jr., Act” April 18, 2017

SB 18 Georgia Public Safety Training Center; any member of security police force; retain his/her weapon and badge under certain conditions April 18, 2017

Former Speaker Newt Gingrich writes for FoxNews about the Sixth Congressional District.

Tuesday, after spending more than $8 million, the Democrats failed to win the special election in Georgia’s Sixth Congressional District.

I had a personal interest in this vote since I represented the Sixth District in Congress for 20 years – however my daughter, Jackie Cushman, likes to note for historical accuracy that the district was originally south and west of Atlanta and was gerrymandered by the Georgia Democrats into the northern suburbs for the 1992 election. That effort backfired spectacularly and cost the Democrats four congressional seats as every part of my old district elected a Republican.

The race was close enough that President Trump, Vice President Pence, Secretary Price (who had won the district by 23 points last year) all made robocalls. Voters were bombarded with vote messages.

Republicans staved off defeat – but by a surprisingly narrow margin.

Now Democrats must decide if they want to pour another $8 million into the runoff in June.

The Democrats have now spent a lot of money to almost win two special elections.

“Almost” doesn’t win elections.

The New York Times looks at what a runoff election means for the Sixth District.

“I think we could be facing all-out war here for the next two months,” Kerwin Swint, a political science professor at Kennesaw State University in Kennesaw, Ga., said Wednesday.

Alan Abramowitz, a political scientist at Emory University in Atlanta, believes that Mr. Ossoff’s supporters will remain motivated enough to return to the polls, and considers the race a “true tossup.” He noted that the conservative Tea Party movement, which bubbled up in early 2009, was still going strong enough to have a significant impact on the midterm elections in late 2010.

“The anti-Trump sentiment, we’ve seen that persist now since the election,” he said. “All the indications are that it is still present, and I don’t think it’s going to fade that quickly.”

CBS46 has an idea what a runoff will be like on the ground.

Just hours after the District 6 congressional race was forced into a runoff, the Republican campaign committee had already begun running attack ads against Democrat Jon Ossoff. Voters say they’re already getting tired.

We have fatigue of all the robocalls, it’s just horrible,” said voter Anna Hunter.

While voters may be tired, the Handel and Ossoff campaigns say they’re ready and refreshed for round two. Ossoff’s campaign manager Keenan Pontoni, says their ads are still running and so are staffers.

“We are talking to voters.  We have over 100 field staffers still doing field work,” said Pontoni.

Dr. Andra Gillespie, an associate political science professor at Emory University, says the ground game will be the key.

“This all comes down to infrastructure and turnout and organization. So both sides have to be mindful of this,” said Gillespie.

Tamar Hallerman writes in the AJC Political Insider about DC plans for the 6th District.

 Corry Bliss, the Leadership Fund’s executive director, said there are plans in the works to scale up their field work – they’d like to knock on 200,000 doors between now and election day on June 20 – and place plenty more media spots attacking Ossoff’s credentials. They unveiled their latest Wednesday.

“We’ll continue to be aggressive in exposing and defining the real Jon Ossoff to the people of Georgia,” Bliss said in an interview Wednesday. “We’ve just begun on that education, and there’s a lot more research that we’ve saved and will be using soon.”

Not to be outdone, the Democratic Congressional Campaign Committee, House Democrats’ political arm, moved Wednesday to reserve $450,000 worth of ad time on Atlanta television stations. They’re aiming to run those in conjunction with Ossoff’s campaign, which made a similar $300,000 buy, the Washington Examiner reported.

Corry Bliss, the Leadership Fund’s executive director, said there are plans in the works to scale up their field work – they’d like to knock on 200,000 doors between now and election day on June 20 – and place plenty more media spots attacking Ossoff’s credentials. They unveiled their latest Wednesday.

“We’ll continue to be aggressive in exposing and defining the real Jon Ossoff to the people of Georgia,” Bliss said in an interview Wednesday. “We’ve just begun on that education, and there’s a lot more research that we’ve saved and will be using soon.”

Not to be outdone, the Democratic Congressional Campaign Committee, House Democrats’ political arm, moved Wednesday to reserve $450,000 worth of ad time on Atlanta television stations. They’re aiming to run those in conjunction with Ossoff’s campaign, which made a similar $300,000 buy, the Washington Examiner reported.

The DCCC’s GOP counterpart, the National Republican Campaign Committee, laid down nearly $2 million in the first round of the race. It’s also gearing up for a new round of fights. Along with other GOP-aligned organizations such as the opposition group America Rising, they’re planning to double down on arguments they think stuck in the media the final days of the campaign: that Ossoff is inexperienced and doesn’t live in the 6th District.

From Elena Schneider at Politico:

“It’s probably going to be the most expensive House seat in U.S. history by the time it’s over,” said Rob Simms, a senior adviser to Handel and former National Republican Congressional Committee executive director, predicting that it will also be even more competitive and hard-fought than the primary.

This is a hard district — period. [But] Ossoff’s got a huge fundraising list, a huge volunteer list and a strong infrastructure already in place. He’s in a strong position to put up this fight,” said Martha McKenna, a Democratic consultant.

“Handel wants to have everyone’s help, and that certainly includes President Trump,” Simms said. “It’s clear that in the response over the past 12 hours that the party is aligning with her, galvanizing and uniting around her. That’s going to be important in June because of the resources that we are going to face on the Democratic side behind Ossoff.”

“Ossoff’s team will continue to do what they’ve done — maximize Democratic turnout in every way they can,” said David Mermin, a Democratic pollster who worked with the Ossoff campaign before the primary and is now helping independent-expenditure efforts in the district. “They’ve identified voters who don’t normally turn out for specials, but they will for Ossoff and for this race.”

State Rep. Chuck Efstration (D-Dacula) and Sen. David Shafer (R-Duluth) spoke to the Gwinnett Chamber about this year’s legislative session.

The pair split the topics, so Shafer talked about statewide issues, such as renewing the hospital bed tax, while Efstration talked about what Gwinnett got in the state budget.

And Gwinnett got a good bit in the budget, ranging from a juvenile justice transition center to an expanded GRTA Xpress Park and ride facility at Sugarloaf Mills that were in the budget.

A lot of the news about what Gwinnett got in the state budget may be familiar to people who follow state politics, but a big item awarded to the county in the budget was the juvenile transition center. The county’s legislators have been kicking around the idea of getting a new regional youth detention center in Gwinnett since the old one closed a few years ago.

“The juvenile transition center is a first of its kind facility in this state to allow more efficient utilization of state resources, Efstration said. “What it will allow for is a detention facility that gives law enforcement officers a drop off point for those juvenile offender so that the officer is not spending an extended period of time taking them to a neighboring county.”

Sandy Springs City Council Member Gabriel Sterling wants to fix the Fulton County elections office that kept political junkies up late Tuesday night, as their reporting of election results was predictably slow.

“We wake up to a newspaper headline that we’ve all gotten accustomed to seeing… ‘6th District Vote: Fulton extends polling hours; DeKalb and Cobb smooth’” noted Fulton Commission Chairman candidate Gabriel Sterling. “I get this question every year, from Democrats and Republicans alike, ‘What the heck is wrong with Fulton elections?’”

In yesterday’s election, a judge had to intervene to extend hours at some Fulton precincts. Also, the final numbers for Fulton were reported several hours after DeKalb and Cobb had reported their final returns due to “technical difficulties”.

“After years of failure, it will take a revolutionary way of thinking to fix the very real, and systemic, problems. I will work with anyone and everyone, Democrat or Republican, willing to admit there are serious issues here,” continued Sandy Springs Councilman Sterling. “Yes, we are a large county. That shouldn’t stop us from doing a great job in conducting our elections. If we fail in that core area, it undermines our credibility across the board.”

“It’s ridiculous and unfair that Ossoff and Handel supporters, as well as every other campaign, had to wait for hours with no updates. It’s not acceptable anymore,” Sterling concluded. “As Chairman, I’ll fix our elections office. We should never have to have judges come in to correct issues that should never exist in the first place. It’s now time to truly fix it.”

2018 Elections

Larry Sabato’s Crystal Ball rates the Georgia 2018 Gubernatorial race as “Likely Republican.”

Trump carried the Peach State by five points, and it’s pretty clear that the GOP bench is much deeper than the Democratic one in the race to replace outgoing Gov. Nathan Deal (R). Georgia Secretary of State Brian Kemp (R) is already in, and Lt. Gov. Casey Cagle (R) is almost certain to run. Campaign guru Nick Ayers (R), a protégé of former Gov. Sonny Perdue (R), might also run, as could former Reps. Jack Kingston (R) and Lynn Westmoreland (R). The Democrats may wind up nominating state House Minority Leader Stacey Abrams (D), state Rep. Stacey Evans (D), or perhaps 2014 nominee and ex-state Sen. Jason Carter (D). Former acting U.S. Attorney General Sally Yates (D) also gets mentioned, but no one really knows if she would run. Likely Republican

Senate President Pro Tem David Shafer (R-Duluth) is reportedly being urged by his legislative colleagues to run for Lieutenant Governor in 2018.

Rep. Chuck Efstration told the Gwinnett Chamber during its legislative recap luncheon at the Sonesta Hotel on Wednesday that Duluth-based Senate President Pro Tempore David Shafer is being sought out as a candidate for lieutenant governor for next year. The seat looks to be open with current Lt. Gov. Casey Cagle making moves to run for governor.

“I’m very excited right now that as discussions about statewide races for constitutional officers takes place, I know Sen. Shafer is being encouraged by many people, including myself, to consider running for lieutenant governor,” Efstration said. “I don’t think we’ve ever had the kinds of opportunities that we do right now for additional influence in Atlanta.”

For his part, Shafer — who also addressed the chamber during the luncheon — was somewhat tight lipped about whether he would run for lieutenant governor next year. He would only offer a tease that something could happen in the next couple of weeks.

Although that is not quite a confirmation that he will announce plans to run for lieutenant governor, it’s not a denial that he’s considering it either.

19
Apr

Bonus Georgia History for April 19, 2017

On April 19, 1775, British troops entered Lexington, Massachusetts, encountering 77 armed Minute Men.

British Major John Pitcairn ordered the outnumbered Patriots to disperse, and after a moment’s hesitation the Americans began to drift off the green. Suddenly, the “shot heard around the world” was fired from an undetermined gun, and a cloud of musket smoke soon covered the green. When the brief Battle of Lexington ended, eight Americans lay dead or dying and 10 others were wounded. Only one British soldier was injured, but the American Revolution had begun.

Two hours later, another confrontation between the British and American patriots took place in Concord, Massachusetts.

On April 19, 1861, President Abraham Lincoln ordered the blockade of ports in “Rebellious States.”

Whereas an insurrection against the Government of the United States has broken out in the States of South Carolina, Georgia, Alabama, Florida, Mississippi, Louisiana, and Texas, and the laws of the United States for the collection of the revenue can not be effectually executed therein conformably to that provision of the Constitution which requires duties to be uniform throughout the United States; and

….

Now, therefore, I, Abraham Lincoln, President of the United States, with a view to the same purposes before mentioned and to the protection of the public peace and the lives and property of quiet and orderly citizens pursuing their lawful occupations until Congress shall have assembled and deliberated on the said unlawful proceedings or until the same shall have ceased, have further deemed it advisable to set on foot a blockade of the ports within the States aforesaid, in pursuance of the laws of the United States and of the law of nations in such case provided. For this purpose a competent force will be posted so as to prevent entrance and exit of vessels from the ports aforesaid.

Union forces skirmished against The Worrill Grays, a Georgia Reserve Militia, at the Battle of Culloden, 30 miles west of Macon on a date generally believed to have been April 19, 1865, though it may have occurred later.

On April 19, 1995, Governor Zell Miller signed legislation declaring the peanut the Official State Crop.

19
Apr

Adoptable (Official) Georgia Dogs for April 19, 2017

The Society of Humane Friends of Georgia is not only a good rescue group, they also support the Gwinnett County Sheriff’s “Jail Dogs” program.

Please consider supporting them with a donation online, or you may mail a check or money order to:

Society of Humane Friends of Georgia
PO Box 1416
Lawrenceville, GA 30046

Finally, you can support them by sending them something from their Amazon.com wish list.

BrooksSOHFGA

Brooks is a 10-week old male Boxer mix puppy who is available for adoption from the Society of Humane Friends of Georgia in Lawrenceville, GA.

Brooks and his siblings (see Bridget, Beatrice and Benson) are sweet and fun loving pups, small now, and will probably be 30-40 lbs when full grown.

BridgetSOHFGA

Bridget is a 10-week old female Boxer mix puppy who is available for adoption from the Society of Humane Friends of Georgia in Lawrenceville, GA.

BensonSOHFGA

Benson is a 10-week old male Boxer mix puppy who is available for adoption from the Society of Humane Friends of Georgia in Lawrenceville, GA.

BeatriceSOHFGA

Beatrice is a 10-week old female Boxer mix puppy who is available for adoption from the Society of Humane Friends of Georgia in Lawrenceville, GA.

19
Apr

Georgia Politics, Campaigns, and Elections for April 19, 2017

On April 20, 1861, Robert E. Lee resigned his commission as a Colonel in the United States Army.

On April 20, 1982, the Atlanta Braves set a major league record, winning the first twelve games of the regular season.

On April 20, 1983, President Ronald Reagan signed legislation authorizing a $165 billion dollar bailout for Social Security, saying,

“This bill demonstrates for all time our nation’s ironclad commitment to Social Security. It assures the elderly that America will always keep the promises made in troubled times a half a century ago. It assures those who are still working that they, too, have a pact with the future. From this day forward, they have one pledge that they will get their fair share of benefits when they retire.”

On April 20, 1992, Governor Zell Miller signed legislation naming Pogo ‘Possum the official state possum of Georgia.

On April 20, 1999, two students entered Columbine High School in Colorado and killed twelve student and one teacher, and wounded 23 others before shooting themselves.

Georgia Politics, Campaigns, and Elections

Former Congressman Dawson Mathis died yesterday at the age of 76. From the Albany Herald:

Mathis, who died Monday, served as U.S. representative for the 2nd Congressional District of Georgia from 1971-81, succeeding U.S. Rep. Maston O’Neal Jr., D-Bainbridge, who decided not to run for re-election in 1970.

Mathis left that House seat to run unsuccessfully for the U.S. Senate in 1980, and then attempted in 1982 to return to his House post by challenging his successor, U.S. Rep. Charles Hatcher, D-Newton.

Mathis left his 2nd District office in 1980 to challenge fellow Democrat U.S. Sen. Herman Talmadge, who had been censured by the Senate for financial misconduct. Talmadge, who had served in the Senate since 1957, survived the challenge from Mathis and a runoff election against future Georgia governor and U.S. senator Zell Miller, but was defeated by Republican Mack Mattingly that fall in the general election.

In April 1982, Mathis, who had served on House Agriculture Committee subcommittees that oversaw peanut and tobacco legislation, announced he would seek to regain his House seat. Pledging that, if successful, he would not abandon it again to run for higher office, he said that he wanted to remain politically active and described his idea of public service.

Fulton County Commissioner Joan Garner died after a long fight with cancer.

Garner is the commissioner for District 4, which encompasses the heart of the City of Atlanta, Midtown, and neighborhoods west of downtown Atlanta to Fulton Industrial Boulevard.

She was appointed to the Transition Team of Mayor Elect Maynard Jackson and the Atlanta Olympic Citizen’s Advisory Commission. She also served as Senior Advisor on Gay and Lesbian Issues under Mayor Jackson.

Under Mayor Kasim Reed, Commissioner Garner served as a member of the Public Works Commissioner Search Committee.

Gwinnett County Commission Chair Charlotte Nash wrote about Garner on Facebook:

Joan was a special person who could find common ground with just about anyone and who disagreed with grace when she felt it was necessary. I was honored that she accepted my invitation to serve as a member of ACCG’s Executive Committee during my year as President. She brought a special sort of wisdom to our deliberations! God’s peace to Jane as she grieves.

Cobb County Commissioners met with employees of the Georgia Secretary of State’s office to discuss the theft of voting equipment before yesterday’s campaign.

The unannounced meeting occurred at about noon Monday in a conference room in the basement of Cobb County State Court on East Park Square in downtown Marietta. Commissioners typically hold meetings in the Cobb Government Building on Cherokee Street, either in the second-floor commission chamber that can hold members of the public, or the third-floor commissioners’ boardroom, which is much smaller.

“We had a special called emergency meeting with the secretary of state’s office, his chief of staff and several of his staff members to discuss the theft and the investigation, and chairman (Mike Boyce) authorized our police department to share information and work with their investigators in anything they needed to continue the investigation,” county spokesperson Sheri Kell said.

Monday’s meeting had been called by Cobb Chairman Mike Boyce in concert with officials with the secretary of state. Boyce said he found out about the theft of the devices at about 9:30 a.m. Monday, and by noon, he, the entire Board of Commissioners and other officials were meeting with representatives from Secretary of State Brian Kemp’s office.

“That’s how seriously both sides took this to mean,” Boyce said. “(Kemp’s office) expressed their concern about what had happened over the weekend, so I thought this was a serious enough concern that everyone on the board should hear about. So they came up from Atlanta, sat down with us and explained to us what are the implications.”

Others in attendance at the meeting included Cobb Board of Elections and Registration Chairman Phil Daniell, Cobb County Manager David Hankerson, County Attorney Deborah Dance and County Clerk Pamela Mabry.

Sixth Congressional District

President Trump weighed in on the 6th District results after a brief tweet-storm.

Trump GA6 Post

 

Trump Tweets GA6

Candidate
Party
Percent
Votes
DAVID ABROMSR0.851637
MOHAMMAD ALI BHUIYANR0.22414
RAGIN EDWARDSD0.26502
KEITH GRAWERTR0.22414
BOB GRAYR10.8120755
KAREN HANDELR19.7837993
ALEXANDER HERNANDEZI0.06121
JUDSON HILLR8.7716848
RICHARD KEATLEYD0.12227
AMY KREMERR0.18349
BRUCE LEVELLR0.24455
WILLIAM LLOPR0.17326
DAN MOODYR8.8516994
JON OSSOFFD48.1092390
ANDRE POLLARDI0.0355
REBECCA QUIGGD0.16304
RON SLOTIND0.25488
KURT WILSONR0.941812

From the New York Times:

Jon Ossoff, a Democrat making his first bid for elective office, narrowly missed winning a heavily conservative House district in Georgia outright on Wednesday, according to The Associated Press. It threw a scare into Republicans in a special congressional election that was seen as an early referendum on President Trump.

Mr. Ossoff received 48.1 percent of the vote, just short of the 50 percent threshold needed to win the seat, and he will face Karen Handel, the top Republican vote-getter, in a June runoff.

Mr. Ossoff released a statement early Wednesday after the race was called.

“This is already a remarkable victory,” he said. “We defied the odds, shattered expectations, and now are ready to fight on and win in June.”

Mr. Ossoff’s strong showing will ensure that national Democrats continue to compete here and will increase pressure on the party to contest a special House election next month in Montana that it has so far ignored. Combined with Democrats’ better-than-expected performance in a special House election in Kansas last week, the Georgia result will be an immediate boon to Democratic groups, lifting their fund-raising and bolstering candidate recruitment efforts, while sobering Republicans who are assessing whether to run in Mr. Trump’s first midterm election. Already, Republican candidates and outside groups have had to spend over $7 million against Democrats in a series of deeply conservative districts.

As Mr. Ossoff faces Ms. Handel in a head-to-head race on June 20, it is unclear whether he will be able to sustain the success he enjoyed on Tuesday, in an 18-person field.

Karl Rove weighed in with his runoff prediction:

Karl Rove said if Ossoff doesn’t get the 50% needed to avoid a runoff the question turns to where he finished. If the candidate is in the high 40s it looks like he will win the runoff, if he’s in the low 40s then the Republican candidate will win.

From Politico.com:

Handel called for Republican unity as she claimed victory.

“Tomorrow we start the campaign anew,” she said, according to the Atlanta Journal Constitution. “Beating Ossoff and holding this seat is something that rises above any one person.”

“We are going to rally behind Karen Handel,” tweeted Gray, who was backed by the Club For Growth, which aired TV ads attacking Handel. “We wish her Godspeed.”

“In a one-on-one race over a 9-week period, he’s going to have to answer questions he didn’t have to answer in the primary, like any issue on policy, on Syria, on tax reform. That becomes a lot harder for him,” said Chip Lake, a Republican consultant in the state. “When there’s 18 people in a race, it’s a bar brawl and no one knows what to look at. But when it’s one-on-one, it’s easier for voters to understand and easier to define it.”

A nationalized race could continue to benefit Ossoff, said former GOP Rep. David Jolly, who said he saw parallels between the current situation in Georgia and the special election he won in Florida in 2014.

“For my race, it was Obamacare. It was a clearly nationalized race about Obamacare. For Ossoff, it will be the first 100 days of Donald Trump,” Jolly said. “The Republican in the runoff will have to struggle to figure out, is it my job to defend Trump, who has a historic unpopularity right now, or is it not? But Ossoff gets to talk non-stop about how the last 100 days are bad.”

 

From the Marietta Daily Journal:

The fact that a Democrat took the most votes in the 6th District came as a surprise to everyone, said Kennesaw State University political science professor Kerwin Swint. “Nobody expected this to be competitive,” Swint said. “Republicans at first were assuming they would get the two runoff spots. I think everyone thought that. The Ossoff campaign has just blossomed as national Democrats have tuned in to the race and seen his potential. And the fundraising has really made the difference. It’s a very different situation than anyone expected.”

That’s not true. On December 1, 2016, I wrote:

Democrats do have significant underlying strength in the Sixth District, and if a single Democratic candidate is on the ballot with five to seven Republicans, the Democrat will almost certainly come out of the first round of the special election, possibly even garnering first place.

This dynamic could even happen with an Independent in the race, as happened in DeKalb County in 2014 when Independent Holmes Pyle took the lion’s share of non-GOP votes, taking first place over four Republicans.

But the December 2014 runoff in DeKalb also shows us what would be the likely result in a CD-6 runoff. Republican Nancy Jester, who took second place in November 2014, consolidated GOP votes in the runoff, taking first with a commanding majority and a margin greater than 3-1.

The Democrat part of the ballot effectively became a one-person race, as Ossoff consolidated Democratic organizational support behind him.

Senate District 32

State Senate District 32 goes to a runoff election between Democrat Christine Triebsch and Republican Kay Kirkpatrick.

The runoff is scheduled for May 16.

Triebsch — a Democrat — received 13,386 votes, or 24.4 percent of the vote, while Kirkpatrick, a Republican — received 11,774 votes, or 21.4, according to unofficial numbers posted by Secretary of State Brian Kemp’s office.

Candidate
Party
Percent
Votes
HAMILTON MATTHEW BECKR3.72165
MATT CAMPBELLR9.995850
ROYDEN 'ROY' DANIELSR15.218904
EXTON HOWARDD6.924050
KAY KIRKPATRICKR21.112354
GUS MAKRISR10.195963
CHRISTINE TRIEBSCHD24.214169
BOB WISKINDD8.685083

From Michelle Baruchman at the AJC:

[Republican Kay] Kirkpatrick campaigned on a promise to increase public safety disaster preparedness, with an emphasis on addressing the Heroin and opioid epidemic, as well as simplifying the tax code and using conservative principles to change health care at the state level. She was the leading fundraiser with contributions from state Reps. Beth Beskin, R-Atlanta and Deborah Silcox, R-Atlanta, and U.S. Health Secretary Tom Price’s wife, state Rep. Elizabeth Price.

[Democrat Christine]Triebsch, a political newcomer who raised the least amount of money among candidates, said her grassroots campaign resonated with voters.

Other 2017 Elections

William B. Edwards won the runoff election for Mayor of the City of South Fulton, taking 59.85%.

South Fulton voters also chose Catherine Rowell, Carmalitha Gumbs, Helen Willis, Naeema Gilyard, Rosie Jackson, Khalid Kamau, and Mark Baker for City Council.

Lori Henry won the Special Runoff Election for Post 4 on the Roswell City Council with 57.81%.

Chris Coughlin was elected to the Johns Creek City Council seat vacated by Bob Gray.

The City of Stonecrest chose Rob Turner, George Turner, and Diane Adoma for City Council.

2018 Elections

Lieutenant Governor Casey Cagle will almost certainly kick off his campaign for Governor in 2018 at an event on April 30 at Infinite Energy Center in Duluth.

Casey Cagle Event

18
Apr

Adoptable (Official) Georgia Dogs for April 18, 2017

Jelly Bean

Jelly Bean is a nine-week old female Wirehaired Terrier & Dachshund mix puppy who is available for adoption from the Society of Humane Friends of GA Inc. in Lawrenceville, GA.

This little girl has short little legs and a wiry coat. We are guessing that she’ll be 20-25 lbs when full grown. And just look at that face! Jelly is sweet and playful, and gets along great with the other puppies in her foster home. She is looking for a home whereher person or family has the time, patience and energy that all pups need to help her grow up to be a great dog. If you’d like to adopt Jelly , please apply at www.sohfga.com.

BunnyGwinnett

Bunny is a nine-week old female Wirehaired Terrier & Dachshund mix puppy who is available for adoption from the Society of Humane Friends of GA Inc. in Lawrenceville, GA.

She are her siblings (see Jelly Bean, Lilly, Peter Cottontail) appear to be a fun and interesting mix of doxie, wirehaired terrier, beagle, shih tzu and more. Bunny is tiny now, and we think she’ll probably be 20-25 lbs when full grown. She’s a sweet, bouncy puppy. She’s looking for a home where her person or family has the time, patience and energy that all pups need to help her grow up to be a great dog. If you’d like to adopt Bunny, please apply at www.sohfga.com.

Willow

Willow is a ten-year old female Terrier & Chihuahua mix who is available for adoption from the Gwinnett County Animal Control and Welfare Shelter in Lawrenceville, GA.

CocoGwinnett

Coco is a 4-year old, 45-pound Labrador Retriever mix female who is available for adoption from the Gwinnett County Animal Control and Welfare Shelter in Lawrenceville, GA.